Lactation

Joshua

Active member
Good day! 😇 I am 28 years old, second pregnancy at 38 weeks. After the first birth, the baby was immediately attached to my breast, and he began to suckle. When we were in the maternity hospital, there was no problem with feeding, when we came home, that is, a week later, very painful cracks appeared on my nipple. The feeding was very painful, but we managed to cope with the help of sea buckthorn oil. Tell me how to avoid a repetition of the situation? What methods of stimulating lactation can be advised? How to prepare my breasts for long-term breastfeeding? Will the use of special feeding pads help in this case?🤱
 

Mireya Tran

Member
Good day! 😇 I am 28 years old, second pregnancy at 38 weeks. After the first birth, the baby was immediately attached to my breast, and he began to suckle. When we were in the maternity hospital, there was no problem with feeding, when we came home, that is, a week later, very painful cracks appeared on my nipple. The feeding was very painful, but we managed to cope with the help of sea buckthorn oil. Tell me how to avoid a repetition of the situation? What methods of stimulating lactation can be advised? How to prepare my breasts for long-term breastfeeding? Will the use of special feeding pads help in this case?🤱
If the cracks are small, then breastfeeding should be continued. You can try using a special silicone or latex nipple pad (Avent, Medela Contact, Lindo, Chicco, Nuk, Conpol, Pigeon, Tommee Tippee, etc.). It separates the baby's lips and nipple, which reduces soreness and the possibility of injury to the breast. It is important to select the correct size for the length of the nipple.
 

Damian Byrd

Active member
Good day! 😇 I am 28 years old, second pregnancy at 38 weeks. After the first birth, the baby was immediately attached to my breast, and he began to suckle. When we were in the maternity hospital, there was no problem with feeding, when we came home, that is, a week later, very painful cracks appeared on my nipple. The feeding was very painful, but we managed to cope with the help of sea buckthorn oil. Tell me how to avoid a repetition of the situation? What methods of stimulating lactation can be advised? How to prepare my breasts for long-term breastfeeding? Will the use of special feeding pads help in this case?🤱
Before starting treatment for nipple cracks, it is necessary to find out the cause of their occurrence. As long as the conditions for breast trauma persist, treatment techniques will be ineffective.
 

Bethany

Well-known member
What are the possible causes?
  1. Make sure your baby is gripping correctly.
  2. Get rid of the infection. Your doctor can prescribe the treatment.
  3. Provide adequate hygiene.
  4. Change your habits, pumping technique. If your actions are the cause of injury, treat your breasts more gently.
  5. Get rid of breast substitutes. Do not bottle feed, as this inhibits lactation, do not offer your baby a pacifier.
 

Evan Cohen

New member
What are the possible causes?
There are a number of factors that trigger cracks:
  • Incorrect nipple shape
    With a flat or inverted nipple, it is more difficult for a baby to grab it correctly, and this increases the likelihood of abrasions and cracks.
  • Improper weaning
    If you try to take the breast away from the baby while sucking, he will instinctively squeeze it even tighter with his gums, damaging the skin of the nipple. You can take out the breast only when the baby releases it itself.
  • Long sucking
    Feeding should not last longer than 30 minutes - there is no more milk in the breast, but the baby continues to injure the nipple. If your baby has a firm grip on the nipple, you can insert a clean finger into the side of his mouth to loosen the grip.
 

Frank9

Active member
There are a number of factors that trigger cracks:
  • Incorrect nipple shape
    With a flat or inverted nipple, it is more difficult for a baby to grab it correctly, and this increases the likelihood of abrasions and cracks.
  • Improper weaning
    If you try to take the breast away from the baby while sucking, he will instinctively squeeze it even tighter with his gums, damaging the skin of the nipple. You can take out the breast only when the baby releases it itself.
  • Long sucking
    Feeding should not last longer than 30 minutes - there is no more milk in the breast, but the baby continues to injure the nipple. If your baby has a firm grip on the nipple, you can insert a clean finger into the side of his mouth to loosen the grip.
Seems like only a few women can evade the condition. Women, prepare to deal with it.
 

Davies

Member
Good day! 😇 I am 28 years old, second pregnancy at 38 weeks. After the first birth, the baby was immediately attached to my breast, and he began to suckle. When we were in the maternity hospital, there was no problem with feeding, when we came home, that is, a week later, very painful cracks appeared on my nipple. The feeding was very painful, but we managed to cope with the help of sea buckthorn oil. Tell me how to avoid a repetition of the situation? What methods of stimulating lactation can be advised? How to prepare my breasts for long-term breastfeeding? Will the use of special feeding pads help in this case?🤱
Good day! Hope you will follow some advice written above and the situation will get better 🙃
 

Kendra Ray

New member
  1. Make sure your baby is gripping correctly.
  2. Get rid of the infection. Your doctor can prescribe the treatment.
  3. Provide adequate hygiene.
  4. Change your habits, pumping technique. If your actions are the cause of injury, treat your breasts more gently.
  5. Get rid of breast substitutes. Do not bottle feed, as this inhibits lactation, do not offer your baby a pacifier.
Thank you Bethany ;)
 

Kendra Ray

New member
There are a number of factors that trigger cracks:
  • Incorrect nipple shape
    With a flat or inverted nipple, it is more difficult for a baby to grab it correctly, and this increases the likelihood of abrasions and cracks.
  • Improper weaning
    If you try to take the breast away from the baby while sucking, he will instinctively squeeze it even tighter with his gums, damaging the skin of the nipple. You can take out the breast only when the baby releases it itself.
  • Long sucking
    Feeding should not last longer than 30 minutes - there is no more milk in the breast, but the baby continues to injure the nipple. If your baby has a firm grip on the nipple, you can insert a clean finger into the side of his mouth to loosen the grip.
Thanks, Evan, didn't know about that 😌
 
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