I have this open wound that hasn't closed up since Christmas

Booth

Active member
Hey, so anyone here have knowledge on dermatology? I have this open wound that hasn't closed up since Christmas last year and every time it gets even close to closing pus starts to leak out from it.
 

Idella

Well-known member
Hey, so anyone here have knowledge on dermatology? I have this open wound that hasn't closed up since Christmas last year and every time it gets even close to closing pus starts to leak out from it.
That's pretty weird, what caused the wound, how bad is it? Its probably infected with bacteria or similar.
 

Booth

Active member
That's pretty weird, what caused the wound, how bad is it? Its probably infected with bacteria or similar.
At first it was a bump about an inch in diameter that would grow and shrink but one day I woke up in the night because I put pressure on it. The next day I went to the doctors to drain it, the drainage went well and the doctor said it should fully heal in about a month or two. Its been 6 and it still hasn't fully healed.
It would close up to about 1/8 of an inch and it would start leaking pus again, this was the fourth time.
Also if I wanted to post pics of the wound where should I post it? I read in the rules about no gore but I think its not that gore-ish because its looks like a gash.
 

Adams

Well-known member
Hey, so anyone here have knowledge on dermatology? I have this open wound that hasn't closed up since Christmas last year and every time it gets even close to closing pus starts to leak out from it.
Well, Hello Booth!

From my experience, this could also be as a result of increase in your blood glucose level. In simpler words, "diabetes." Your pancreas is probably not secreting enough insulin and glucose remains in your blood stream and could prevent wounds from healing. You can try checking your blood glucose level.
 

Booth

Active member
I really hope it ain't diabetes though.

Okay, now I'm scared! I eat a lot of sugar. I really don't like the thought of having diabetes. Not diabetes, please.:cry:
 

Christina

Well-known member
There are many causes of prolonged wound healing. It might not be diabetes so don't fret. Infections are usually the most common cause of prolonged wound healing so I suggest you could also have a check around the site of injury. Peharps it could have just been the effect of an infection that has been allowed to spread.
 

Adams

Well-known member
I think you should just go see a Physician, Booth! Ten months with an injury! If you ask me, I'll say that's quite along time.
 

Jackie

Well-known member
You mentioned Hemostasis, Adams and it got me thinking. Well, if the various coagulation factors are usually triggered to form a clot and seal up the site of an injury, then what possible reactions might diabetes or infections have on these factors that prevents the closure and healing of an injury?
 

Adams

Well-known member
Should I answer here or you'll send me a private text so that we could talk elaborately on your question?
 

Adams

Well-known member
Evidence from study over time suggests that diabetes mellitus can disturb normal Hemostasis. Hyperglycemia affects multiple steps of coagulation such as thrombus formation and inhibition, fibrinolysis, platelet, and endothelial function.

You see, thrombus formation is a very important part of the coagulation Cascade.
Platelets may stick to areas where the blood vessels are damaged and form clots. Diabetes increases the risk of plaque buildup in the arteries, which can cause dangerous blood clots.
 

Jackie

Well-known member
Evidence from study over time suggests that diabetes mellitus can disturb normal Hemostasis. Hyperglycemia affects multiple steps of coagulation such as thrombus formation and inhibition, fibrinolysis, platelet, and endothelial function.

You see, thrombus formation is a very important part of the coagulation Cascade.
Platelets may stick to areas where the blood vessels are damaged and form clots. Diabetes increases the risk of plaque buildup in the arteries, which can cause dangerous blood clots.
Wow! Wonderful explanation Adams, thanks..
 

Bennett

Active member
Evidence from study over time suggests that diabetes mellitus can disturb normal Hemostasis. Hyperglycemia affects multiple steps of coagulation such as thrombus formation and inhibition, fibrinolysis, platelet, and endothelial function.

You see, thrombus formation is a very important part of the coagulation Cascade.
Platelets may stick to areas where the blood vessels are damaged and form clots. Diabetes increases the risk of plaque buildup in the arteries, which can cause dangerous blood clots.
Great! Thank you Adams.
 
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