Huntington disease.

Sam

Well-known member
Hello, Lily.

So, Huntington disease is a progressive brain disorder that causes uncontrolled movements, emotional problems, and loss of thinking ability (cognition).

Adult-onset Huntington disease, the most common form of this disorder, usually appears in a person's thirties or forties. Early signs and symptoms can include irritability, depression, small involuntary movements, poor coordination, and trouble learning new information or making decisions. Many people with Huntington disease develop involuntary jerking or twitching movements known as chorea. As the disease progresses, these movements become more pronounced. Affected individuals may have trouble walking, speaking, and swallowing. People with this disorder also experience changes in personality and a decline in thinking and reasoning abilities. Individuals with the adult-onset form of Huntington disease usually live about 15 to 20 years after signs and symptoms begin.
 
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Sam

Well-known member
And so far, there's been no cure for this?
Hey there Layla,
There's currently no cure for Huntington's disease or any way to stop it getting worse. But treatment and support can help reduce some of the problems caused by the condition.
 

Liam

Well-known member
Hey there Layla,
There's currently no cure for Huntington's disease or any way to stop it getting worse. But treatment and support can help reduce some of the problems caused by the condition.
Don't forget to mention that in many areas, there are Huntington's disease clinics run by a specialist doctor and nurse, who can offer treatment and support and refer you to other specialists if needed.

Research into new treatments is ongoing and there have been some promising results recently.
 

Alfredo

Well-known member
Hello, Lily.

So, Huntington disease is a progressive brain disorder that causes uncontrolled movements, emotional problems, and loss of thinking ability (cognition).

Adult-onset Huntington disease, the most common form of this disorder, usually appears in a person's thirties or forties. Early signs and symptoms can include irritability, depression, small involuntary movements, poor coordination, and trouble learning new information or making decisions. Many people with Huntington disease develop involuntary jerking or twitching movements known as chorea. As the disease progresses, these movements become more pronounced. Affected individuals may have trouble walking, speaking, and swallowing. People with this disorder also experience changes in personality and a decline in thinking and reasoning abilities. Individuals with the adult-onset form of Huntington disease usually live about 15 to 20 years after signs and symptoms begin.

A less common form of Huntington disease known as the juvenile form begins in childhood or adolescence. It also involves movement problems and mental and emotional changes. Additional signs of the juvenile form include slow movements, clumsiness, frequent falling, rigidity, slurred speech, and drooling. School performance declines as thinking and reasoning abilities become impaired. Seizures occur in 30 percent to 50 percent of children with this condition. Juvenile Huntington disease tends to progress more quickly than the adult-onset form; affected individuals usually live 10 to 15 years after signs and symptoms appear.
Sam, is this disease peculiar to a particular race of people or can it affect just anyone?
 

Sam

Well-known member
Don't forget to mention that in many areas, there are Huntington's disease clinics run by a specialist doctor and nurse, who can offer treatment and support and refer you to other specialists if needed.

Research into new treatments is ongoing and there have been some promising results recently.
Thank you very much Liam.
Also I made mention of some other diseases that could rise from
Sam, is this disease peculiar to a particular race of people or can it affect just anyone?
Okay, Hey there Alfredo.
Huntington disease affects an estimated 3 to 7 per 100,000 people of European ancestry. The disorder appears to be less common in some other populations, including people of Japanese, Chinese, and African descent.
 

Lily Michael

Active member
Hello, Lily.

So, Huntington disease is a progressive brain disorder that causes uncontrolled movements, emotional problems, and loss of thinking ability (cognition).

Adult-onset Huntington disease, the most common form of this disorder, usually appears in a person's thirties or forties. Early signs and symptoms can include irritability, depression, small involuntary movements, poor coordination, and trouble learning new information or making decisions. Many people with Huntington disease develop involuntary jerking or twitching movements known as chorea. As the disease progresses, these movements become more pronounced. Affected individuals may have trouble walking, speaking, and swallowing. People with this disorder also experience changes in personality and a decline in thinking and reasoning abilities. Individuals with the adult-onset form of Huntington disease usually live about 15 to 20 years after signs and symptoms begin.

A less common form of Huntington disease known as the juvenile form begins in childhood or adolescence. It also involves movement problems and mental and emotional changes. Additional signs of the juvenile form include slow movements, clumsiness, frequent falling, rigidity, slurred speech, and drooling. School performance declines as thinking and reasoning abilities become impaired. Seizures occur in 30 percent to 50 percent of children with this condition. Juvenile Huntington disease tends to progress more quickly than the adult-onset form; affected individuals usually live 10 to 15 years after signs and symptoms appear.
Thank you, Sam.
Also, are there ways to help people that have been diagnosed with this disease, are there ways to help them get by daily?
 

Sam

Well-known member
Thank you, Sam.
Also, are there ways to help people that have been diagnosed with this disease, are there ways to help them get by daily?
Oh yes.
Now, daily tasks such as getting dressed, moving around the house and eating can be frustrating and exhausting for a person with Huntington's disease.

An occupational therapist can look at activities they find difficult and see if there's another way they can carry them out.

They can also recommend changes that could be made to the house and equipment that can be used to make things easier for them

These can include:

1.putting in ramps so an area can be accessed in a wheelchair.
2. Fitting a stairlift.
3. Installing grab rails – for example, by the stairs or beside the bed.
4. Using electric can openers, electric toothbrushes and kitchen utensils with large handles that are easier to hold.
5. Voice-controlled lights or voice-controlled software on a computer.

All these and more help patients to have easy access to household items and materials.
 

Layla

Active member
Don't forget to mention that in many areas, there are Huntington's disease clinics run by a specialist doctor and nurse, who can offer treatment and support and refer you to other specialists if needed.

Research into new treatments is ongoing and there have been some promising results recently.
What is the mode of transfer of this disease, please?
 

Liam

Well-known member
What is the mode of transfer of this disease, please?
Well, Mutations in the HTT gene cause Huntington disease. The HTT gene provides instructions for making a protein called huntingtin. Although the function of this protein is unclear, it appears to play an important role in nerve cells (neurons) in the brain.

The HTT mutation that causes Huntington disease involves a DNA segment known as a CAG trinucleotide repeat. This segment is made up of a series of three DNA building blocks (cytosine, adenine, and guanine) that appear multiple times in a row. Normally, the CAG segment is repeated 10 to 35 times within the gene. In people with Huntington disease, the CAG segment is repeated 36 to more than 120 times. People with 36 to 39 CAG repeats may or may not develop the signs and symptoms of Huntington disease, while people with 40 or more repeats almost always develop the disorder.

An increase in the size of the CAG segment leads to the production of an abnormally long version of the huntington protein. The elongated protein is cut into smaller, toxic fragments that bind together and accumulate in neurons, disrupting the normal functions of these cells. The dysfunction and eventual death of neurons in certain areas of the brain underlie the signs and symptoms of Huntington disease.
 

Layla

Active member
Well, Mutations in the HTT gene cause Huntington disease. The HTT gene provides instructions for making a protein called huntingtin. Although the function of this protein is unclear, it appears to play an important role in nerve cells (neurons) in the brain.

The HTT mutation that causes Huntington disease involves a DNA segment known as a CAG trinucleotide repeat. This segment is made up of a series of three DNA building blocks (cytosine, adenine, and guanine) that appear multiple times in a row. Normally, the CAG segment is repeated 10 to 35 times within the gene. In people with Huntington disease, the CAG segment is repeated 36 to more than 120 times. People with 36 to 39 CAG repeats may or may not develop the signs and symptoms of Huntington disease, while people with 40 or more repeats almost always develop the disorder.

An increase in the size of the CAG segment leads to the production of an abnormally long version of the huntington protein. The elongated protein is cut into smaller, toxic fragments that bind together and accumulate in neurons, disrupting the normal functions of these cells. The dysfunction and eventual death of neurons in certain areas of the brain underlie the signs and symptoms of Huntington disease.
In other words, it is a genetic disorder?
 

Lily Michael

Active member
Oh yes.
Now, daily tasks such as getting dressed, moving around the house and eating can be frustrating and exhausting for a person with Huntington's disease.

An occupational therapist can look at activities they find difficult and see if there's another way they can carry them out.

They can also recommend changes that could be made to the house and equipment that can be used to make things easier for them

These can include:

1.putting in ramps so an area can be accessed in a wheelchair.
2. Fitting a stairlift.
3. Installing grab rails – for example, by the stairs or beside the bed.
4. Using electric can openers, electric toothbrushes and kitchen utensils with large handles that are easier to hold.
5. Voice-controlled lights or voice-controlled software on a computer.

All these and more help patients to have easy access to household items and materials.
Okay.
Are there other names used to refer to this particular condition?
 

Govanni

Active member
Don't forget to mention that in many areas, there are Huntington's disease clinics run by a specialist doctor and nurse, who can offer treatment and support and refer you to other specialists if needed.

Research into new treatments is ongoing and there have been some promising results recently.
Can we know about the researches being done to curb this disease?
 

Liam

Well-known member
Can we know about the researches being done to curb this disease?
Okay, as we speak, research is underway to find new treatments for Huntington's disease.
Progress has been made in identifying possible ways of slowing down or halting the condition by "switching off" the faulty gene that causes it.
Several treatments are now going through clinical trials. If they're found to be safe and effective, they might be available in several years' time.
 

Govanni

Active member
Okay, as we speak, research is underway to find new treatments for Huntington's disease.
Progress has been made in identifying possible ways of slowing down or halting the condition by "switching off" the faulty gene that causes it.
Several treatments are now going through clinical trials. If they're found to be safe and effective, they might be available in several years' time.
Okay, we sure hope for the best then.
Thank you, Liam.
 
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