How do inhalers for asthma work?

Bell

Member
I know that there are two inhalers that asthmatic ppl use One steroid inhaler for regular use I think? And one for emergencies Salbutamol? I keep forgetting But how do they work?
 

Selah Watts

New member
Salbutamol is (like Fenoterol and Terbutaline) a short acting beta 2 agonist (SABA).

They are used in case of symptoms like an asthma attack. They are acting on beta 2 adrenoreceptors (same as epinephrine=adrenaline)

As you maybe already know: Epinephrine expands the bronchi. Making it easier for the patient to breath.

The steroid inhaler is usually budesonide. More than half of the medication that is inhaled is usually swallowed and has systemic side effects. Budesonide has a bad resorption rate, which means not much of the swallowed drug is going into the blood stream. That's why budesonide is usually preferred.

Cortico-steroids like budesonide are all anti-inflammatory drugs. Cortico-Steroids induce "I kappa B" (which inhibits TNF alpha) and other anti inflammatory proteins. In high concentration corticosteroids inhibit the Phospholipase C (PLC is needed for the first step of prostaglandin -synthesis, see NSAR).

The more common type of asthma is the allergic asthma. The progression leads to scarring of the lung-tissue due to the inflammation. Cortico-Steroids should slow down that progression AND they also sensitive the cells vs SABAs again.

After frequent use of SABAs/LABAs the effect of SABAs/ LABAs can be diminished, we call that tachyphylaxis. Corticosteroids are doing the opposite, they increase sensitivity and number/density of beta2-receptors.
 

Evan Cohen

New member
Salbutamol is (like Fenoterol and Terbutaline) a short acting beta 2 agonist (SABA).

They are used in case of symptoms like an asthma attack. They are acting on beta 2 adrenoreceptors (same as epinephrine=adrenaline)

As you maybe already know: Epinephrine expands the bronchi. Making it easier for the patient to breath.

The steroid inhaler is usually budesonide. More than half of the medication that is inhaled is usually swallowed and has systemic side effects. Budesonide has a bad resorption rate, which means not much of the swallowed drug is going into the blood stream. That's why budesonide is usually preferred.

Cortico-steroids like budesonide are all anti-inflammatory drugs. Cortico-Steroids induce "I kappa B" (which inhibits TNF alpha) and other anti inflammatory proteins. In high concentration corticosteroids inhibit the Phospholipase C (PLC is needed for the first step of prostaglandin -synthesis, see NSAR).

The more common type of asthma is the allergic asthma. The progression leads to scarring of the lung-tissue due to the inflammation. Cortico-Steroids should slow down that progression AND they also sensitive the cells vs SABAs again.

After frequent use of SABAs/LABAs the effect of SABAs/ LABAs can be diminished, we call that tachyphylaxis. Corticosteroids are doing the opposite, they increase sensitivity and number/density of beta2-receptors.
Thank you for giving your explanation!
 

Jupiter

Active member
Salbutamol is (like Fenoterol and Terbutaline) a short acting beta 2 agonist (SABA).

They are used in case of symptoms like an asthma attack. They are acting on beta 2 adrenoreceptors (same as epinephrine=adrenaline)

As you maybe already know: Epinephrine expands the bronchi. Making it easier for the patient to breath.

The steroid inhaler is usually budesonide. More than half of the medication that is inhaled is usually swallowed and has systemic side effects. Budesonide has a bad resorption rate, which means not much of the swallowed drug is going into the blood stream. That's why budesonide is usually preferred.

Cortico-steroids like budesonide are all anti-inflammatory drugs. Cortico-Steroids induce "I kappa B" (which inhibits TNF alpha) and other anti inflammatory proteins. In high concentration corticosteroids inhibit the Phospholipase C (PLC is needed for the first step of prostaglandin -synthesis, see NSAR).

The more common type of asthma is the allergic asthma. The progression leads to scarring of the lung-tissue due to the inflammation. Cortico-Steroids should slow down that progression AND they also sensitive the cells vs SABAs again.

After frequent use of SABAs/LABAs the effect of SABAs/ LABAs can be diminished, we call that tachyphylaxis. Corticosteroids are doing the opposite, they increase sensitivity and number/density of beta2-receptors.
(y) very informative
 
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