Folliculitis

Grant

Member
Of course, Ford.
Folliculitis is a relatively common skin disorder caused by inflammation and infection in the hair follicles. Types of folliculitis include razor bumps, hot tub rash, and barber’s itch.
 
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Kleo

Active member
Of course, Grant.
Folliculitis is a relatively common skin disorder caused by inflammation and infection in the hair follicles. Types of folliculitis include razor bumps, hot tub rash, and barber’s itch.
What could be the cause of this disorder? A virus, bacteria..?
 

Claire

Active member
What could be the cause of this disorder? A virus, bacteria..?
Hello Kleo,
Okay so, folliculitis is generally caused by a bacterial infection, commonly Staphylococcus aureus, or staph. However, fungal infections, viruses, and physical trauma to the follicle can all contribute to folliculitis.
 

Kleo

Active member
Hello Kleo,
Okay so, folliculitis is generally caused by a bacterial infection, commonly Staphylococcus aureus, or staph. However, fungal infections, viruses, and physical trauma to the follicle can all contribute to folliculitis.
Okay, so are there activities that encourage its growth?
 

Claire

Active member
Okay, so are there activities that encourage its growth?
Certainly.
Folliculitis is linked to:
- Shaving, tight hair braids, tight clothing, ingrown hairs, clothing that rubs the skin, sweat or personal products that irritate the follicle, skin-clogging substances, such as tar and motor oil
covering the skin with non-breathable items, such as tape or plastic.
Also skin conditions, such as acne or dermatitis
injuries to the skin, including cuts or insect bites, using an unclean hot tub or swimming pool, an infected cut or wound (which allows bacteria to spread to nearby hair follicles),
weakened immune system caused by conditions, such as HIV or cancer, being overweight or obese, long-term use of some medications, including antibiotics or steroid creams.. these are a handful of factors that can actually flag off folliculitis.
 

Kleo

Active member
Certainly.
Folliculitis is linked to:
- Shaving, tight hair braids, tight clothing, ingrown hairs, clothing that rubs the skin, sweat or personal products that irritate the follicle, skin-clogging substances, such as tar and motor oil
covering the skin with non-breathable items, such as tape or plastic.
Also skin conditions, such as acne or dermatitis
injuries to the skin, including cuts or insect bites, using an unclean hot tub or swimming pool, an infected cut or wound (which allows bacteria to spread to nearby hair follicles),
weakened immune system caused by conditions, such as HIV or cancer, being overweight or obese, long-term use of some medications, including antibiotics or steroid creams.. these are a handful of factors that can actually flag off folliculitis.
Wow.
Thanks for the information, Claire.
 

Davies

Active member
Of course, Grant.
Folliculitis is a relatively common skin disorder caused by inflammation and infection in the hair follicles. Types of folliculitis include razor bumps, hot tub rash, and barber’s itch.
That explains the little rashes I've been having on my hair. Mr Grant, is this situation threatening in any way?
 

Grant

Member
That explains the little rashes I've been having on my hair. Mr Grant, is this situation threatening in any way?
Okay, hello there Davies.
Now, although folliculitis is not life-threatening, some complications may arise when it is not treated or tackled early. These include:
- Furunculosis – boils under the skin
scars or dark patches.
- Permanent hair loss due to follicle damage
recurrent follicle infections.
- Infections that spread to other areas.
- Cellulitis – infection of the skin.
 

Colton77

Active member
Hello Kleo,
Okay so, folliculitis is generally caused by a bacterial infection, commonly Staphylococcus aureus, or staph. However, fungal infections, viruses, and physical trauma to the follicle can all contribute to folliculitis.
Claire, I'd like to know. How can this be diagnosed?
 

Claire

Active member
Claire, I'd like to know. How can this be diagnosed?
Okay, Colton.
Well, doctors tend to diagnose folliculitis based on a physical examination. Now, the doctor may examine the skin, take note of symptoms, and review the person’s medical and family history.
A clinical scientist may also take a swab of the infected skin to test for which bacteria or fungus has caused the folliculitis.
In rare cases, a skin biopsy may be required to exclude the possibility of other causes.
 

Davies

Active member
Okay, hello there Davies.
Now, although folliculitis is not life-threatening, some complications may arise when it is not treated or tackled early. These include:
- Furunculosis – boils under the skin
scars or dark patches.
- Permanent hair loss due to follicle damage
recurrent follicle infections.
- Infections that spread to other areas.
- Cellulitis – infection of the skin.
Is there a treatment program or cure for this?
 

Grant

Member
Is there a treatment program or cure for this?
Yes, now the treatment for folliculitis varies based on the type and severity of the condition.

Mild cases often only require home remedies. However, severe or recurrent cases may need medication or other therapies.
 

Davies

Active member
Yes, now the treatment for folliculitis varies based on the type and severity of the condition.

Mild cases often only require home remedies. However, severe or recurrent cases may need medication or other therapies.
Let's focus on the home remedies please, how can I get this done?
 

Grant

Member
Let's focus on the home remedies please, how can I get this done?
Okay, a very good number of home remedies are very effective at treating folliculitis and its symptoms. They include:
1. Warm compresses: Placing a warm compress on the affected area can reduce itching and draw out pus. To make a compress, simply soak a cloth in warm water and wring out the excess. Apply to the skin for up to 20 minutes. Repeat as needed.
2. Over-the-counter products: Several topical creams, gels, and washes are available for folliculitis without a prescription.
3. Good hygiene: Gently washing the affected area twice daily with a mild soap will help reduce the infection. Always use clean hands. A washcloth is not recommended as it can cause further irritation to the skin. Use a clean towel for drying. Wash all towels after use to reduce the risk of transmitting the infection.

These activities can help curb the minor occurrence of folliculitis.
 
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Davies

Active member
Okay, a very good number of home remedies are very effective at treating folliculitis and its symptoms. They include:
1. Warm compresses: Placing a warm compress on the affected area can reduce itching and draw out pus. To make a compress, simply soak a cloth in warm water and wring out the excess. Apply to the skin for up to 20 minutes. Repeat as needed.
2. Over-the-counter products: Several topical creams, gels, and washes are available for folliculitis without a prescription.
3. Good hygiene: Gently washing the affected area twice daily with a mild soap will help reduce the infection. Always use clean hands. A washcloth is not recommended as it can cause further irritation to the skin. Use a clean towel for drying. Wash all towels after use to reduce the risk of transmitting the infection.
4. Soothing bath: Soaking in a tub of warm water may help reduce the itching and pain associated with folliculitis. Adding oatmeal or an oatmeal-based product can be helpful, as research suggests it has anti-inflammatory properties. Also alternatively, one cup of baking soda added to a bath may also ease symptoms. Thoroughly dry the skin after bathing.
5. Protect the skin: Avoid wearing tight or irritating clothing, reduce the risk of exposing the skin to harsh chemicals and skincare products, and try to limit shaving and trim instead when possible. When shaving, use a lubricant, and keep the blade clean and sharp...
These activities can help curb the minor occurrence of folliculitis.
Wow. Okay!
Thank you for this information, Grant.
 

Colton77

Active member
Okay, Colton.
Well, doctors tend to diagnose folliculitis based on a physical examination. Now, the doctor may examine the skin, take note of symptoms, and review the person’s medical and family history.
A clinical scientist may also take a swab of the infected skin to test for which bacteria or fungus has caused the folliculitis.
In rare cases, a skin biopsy may be required to exclude the possibility of other causes.
Alright. This information would come in handy I'm certain. Thank you, Claire.
 
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