Counteracting weight gain from medications?

Jackie

Well-known member
I know I am more prone to weight gain from the medications I am currently on. I have gained nearly 40 pounds just this year which is A LOT to put on in only 9 months.

I keep seeing the scale go up no matter how little I eat. I even started exercising 20 minutes a day but still, I can't manage to lose it. Does anyone know how to correct this without going off my medications?
 

Henry

Member
I know I am more prone to weight gain from the medications I am currently on. I have gained nearly 40 pounds just this year which is A LOT to put on in only 9 months.

I keep seeing the scale go up no matter how little I eat. I even started exercising 20 minutes a day but still, I can't manage to lose it. Does anyone know how to correct this without going off my medications?
You didn't tell us the type of food that you eat. See, there is a possibility that the little food that you eat can contain some large amount of fatty contents that is not good for the body. What I will advise is for you to adopt eating once a day, if that can go fine with your medication as well.
 
The key to weight control is involved with controlled eating and exercise. I would advise you to take a balanced diet that contains high amounts of carbohydrates, protein and low fat. It is better to eat low-calorie foods rather than high-calorie foods. It is better to eat more fruits, vegetables, it will eat less fat and sugar free foods and also meet the demand for protein. The list of foods contains vitamin, mineral and antioxidants.
 

Caitlin27

Member
I know I am more prone to weight gain from the medications I am currently on. I have gained nearly 40 pounds just this year which is A LOT to put on in only 9 months.

I keep seeing the scale go up no matter how little I eat. I even started exercising 20 minutes a day but still, I can't manage to lose it. Does anyone know how to correct this without going off my medications?
Hi Jackie,

Sorry to hear about your struggles. Don’t worry though and there are ways you can help to reduce further weight gain and potentially achieve weight loss.

One idea is to plan out your meals, this helps people not to be tempted to reach for the biscuits on the cupboard and mindlessly snack- come the evening you probably have forgotten that little treat and are left puzzled as to why your ‘rough meal plan’ isn’t helping you lose weight.

A healthy meal plan should consist of approximately 180g carbohydrates spread out across the day; these should be low on the glycemic index, so that the energy released is slower, not giving you a ‘sugar high’ which is inevitably followed by a ‘sugar crash’. This prevents hunger pangs stroking after the sugar crash and thus should reduce snacking and therefore your overall calorie intake.

The diet plan should also include approximately 1g of protein per kg of body weight (perhaps 1.5g of protein of your cutting your carbs lower). This will ensure satiation, again reducing hunger pangs and the urge to snack. High protein diets and low glycemic index carbohydrates combined provide the basis for an incredible blood sugar level, as both serve to avoid any highs or crashes.

Hope my advice helps! Wishing you luck 😊
 

Oskar

Well-known member
The final component of your diet plan should be last but certainly not least, veggies!! However, don’t confuse vegetables with fruit. Unfortunately, fruit contains fructose which when metabolizes, becomes glucose - i.e. SUGAR. And we all know... sugar= calories. So take it easy on the fruit, but go mad with the veggies 🥦
 

Sam6065

Member
It may not fit it with your current medication/ illness requirements, but ok could consider hiring a personal trainer or joining a gym?

Or even going for a morning swim on the weekends in your local leisure centre?

I often found that just walking for half an hour during my lunch at work added that little bit extra of ‘calorie burn’ to keep my diet on track.
 

Jenna Moore

Active member
Hi Jackie,

Sorry to hear about your struggles. Don’t worry though and there are ways you can help to reduce further weight gain and potentially achieve weight loss.

One idea is to plan out your meals, this helps people not to be tempted to reach for the biscuits on the cupboard and mindlessly snack- come the evening you probably have forgotten that little treat and are left puzzled as to why your ‘rough meal plan’ isn’t helping you lose weight.

A healthy meal plan should consist of approximately 180g carbohydrates spread out across the day; these should be low on the glycemic index, so that the energy released is slower, not giving you a ‘sugar high’ which is inevitably followed by a ‘sugar crash’. This prevents hunger pangs stroking after the sugar crash and thus should reduce snacking and therefore your overall calorie intake.

The diet plan should also include approximately 1g of protein per kg of body weight (perhaps 1.5g of protein of your cutting your carbs lower). This will ensure satiation, again reducing hunger pangs and the urge to snack. High protein diets and low glycemic index carbohydrates combined provide the basis for an incredible blood sugar level, as both serve to avoid any highs or crashes.

Hope my advice helps! Wishing you luck 😊
Hey, Caitlin, you gave such a detailed reply, you seem to be very nice and caring :giggle:
 

Melanie Begley

New member
I know I am more prone to weight gain from the medications I am currently on. I have gained nearly 40 pounds just this year which is A LOT to put on in only 9 months.

I keep seeing the scale go up no matter how little I eat. I even started exercising 20 minutes a day but still, I can't manage to lose it. Does anyone know how to correct this without going off my medications?
Yes, this can happen to anyone and it's not a good thing but the sooner you work on it the better for you.
 
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