Are there any circumstances under which a generic drug is not as good as a brand-name drug?

Brinna98

New member
Generic drugs have the same active ingredient as the original one, and the similarities end here. Mostly a different synthesis route is used, resulting in different byproduct contamination profiles, different ratios of isomers. Cheap packaging results in less efficient delivery.

Let’s take a look at a well-known drug, vitamin C. Chemically it’s L-ascorbic acid, the D-enantiomer has no biological activity. Vitamine C is destroyed in the stomach by the acidic pH there.

A good quality product contains the L-enantiomer only, a cheaper generic might contain both isomers. Many synthesis routes result in a racemic mixture of isomers, it’s usually a complicated and expensive procedure to separate them or conduct the synthesis in a way yielding the preferred isomer in higher quantity. Cheap generic versions might be pressed powder only (so only a small fraction will survive the stomach), while more expensive versions usually employ special coatings which protect the active ingredient from the stomach, only dissolve in the bowel, with calculated timing to provide an even blood level for a longer time.

For some drugs, there is no or minimal difference between the “original” and generic versions while for others there is a huge difference in side effects, etc.
 

Albert

Well-known member
Generic drugs have the same active ingredient as the original one, and the similarities end here. Mostly a different synthesis route is used, resulting in different byproduct contamination profiles, different ratios of isomers. Cheap packaging results in less efficient delivery.

Let’s take a look at a well-known drug, vitamin C. Chemically it’s L-ascorbic acid, the D-enantiomer has no biological activity. Vitamine C is destroyed in the stomach by the acidic pH there.

A good quality product contains the L-enantiomer only, a cheaper generic might contain both isomers. Many synthesis routes result in a racemic mixture of isomers, it’s usually a complicated and expensive procedure to separate them or conduct the synthesis in a way yielding the preferred isomer in higher quantity. Cheap generic versions might be pressed powder only (so only a small fraction will survive the stomach), while more expensive versions usually employ special coatings which protect the active ingredient from the stomach, only dissolve in the bowel, with calculated timing to provide an even blood level for a longer time.

For some drugs, there is no or minimal difference between the “original” and generic versions while for others there is a huge difference in side effects, etc.
Contrary to the current misconception, generics are no worse than standard, patented drugs. All that distinguishes simple Viagra tablets from generics is a patent for the production of these products. Naturally, if one type of tablet is produced under a screaming name, this does not mean that they are better than the widely distributed and proven generics.
 

Ivan

Member
Generic drugs have the same active ingredient as the original one, and the similarities end here. Mostly a different synthesis route is used, resulting in different byproduct contamination profiles, different ratios of isomers. Cheap packaging results in less efficient delivery.

Let’s take a look at a well-known drug, vitamin C. Chemically it’s L-ascorbic acid, the D-enantiomer has no biological activity. Vitamine C is destroyed in the stomach by the acidic pH there.

A good quality product contains the L-enantiomer only, a cheaper generic might contain both isomers. Many synthesis routes result in a racemic mixture of isomers, it’s usually a complicated and expensive procedure to separate them or conduct the synthesis in a way yielding the preferred isomer in higher quantity. Cheap generic versions might be pressed powder only (so only a small fraction will survive the stomach), while more expensive versions usually employ special coatings which protect the active ingredient from the stomach, only dissolve in the bowel, with calculated timing to provide an even blood level for a longer time.

For some drugs, there is no or minimal difference between the “original” and generic versions while for others there is a huge difference in side effects, etc.
That's true. The process of making brand drugs can take time and resources while in the other, it is entirely different. The pricing of drugs with minimal changes between the generic ones and the brand drugs should be the point of talk to ensure patients are not been exploited.
 

Damien Houston

New member
Generic drugs have the same active ingredient as the original one, and the similarities end here. Mostly a different synthesis route is used, resulting in different byproduct contamination profiles, different ratios of isomers. Cheap packaging results in less efficient delivery.

Let’s take a look at a well-known drug, vitamin C. Chemically it’s L-ascorbic acid, the D-enantiomer has no biological activity. Vitamine C is destroyed in the stomach by the acidic pH there.

A good quality product contains the L-enantiomer only, a cheaper generic might contain both isomers. Many synthesis routes result in a racemic mixture of isomers, it’s usually a complicated and expensive procedure to separate them or conduct the synthesis in a way yielding the preferred isomer in higher quantity. Cheap generic versions might be pressed powder only (so only a small fraction will survive the stomach), while more expensive versions usually employ special coatings which protect the active ingredient from the stomach, only dissolve in the bowel, with calculated timing to provide an even blood level for a longer time.

For some drugs, there is no or minimal difference between the “original” and generic versions while for others there is a huge difference in side effects, etc.
When it comes to brand and generic drugs I think what matters is safety precaution motive to the customer a customer will prefer to buy a brand drug to a generic drug because if something happens the brand I have it integrity as take the generic drugs you can't really wait for the potency of the drugs you are buying even though they do the same thing because the brand is not known so branding is highly important business.
 

Jayla

New member
Generic drugs have the same active ingredient as the original one, and the similarities end here. Mostly a different synthesis route is used, resulting in different byproduct contamination profiles, different ratios of isomers. Cheap packaging results in less efficient delivery.

Let’s take a look at a well-known drug, vitamin C. Chemically it’s L-ascorbic acid, the D-enantiomer has no biological activity. Vitamine C is destroyed in the stomach by the acidic pH there.

A good quality product contains the L-enantiomer only, a cheaper generic might contain both isomers. Many synthesis routes result in a racemic mixture of isomers, it’s usually a complicated and expensive procedure to separate them or conduct the synthesis in a way yielding the preferred isomer in higher quantity. Cheap generic versions might be pressed powder only (so only a small fraction will survive the stomach), while more expensive versions usually employ special coatings which protect the active ingredient from the stomach, only dissolve in the bowel, with calculated timing to provide an even blood level for a longer time.

For some drugs, there is no or minimal difference between the “original” and generic versions while for others there is a huge difference in side effects, etc.
Complex but seems valid.
 
Top